CLEX, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes

The Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes (CLEX) is a major initiative funded by the Australian Research Council. The Centre is an international research consortium of five Australian universities and a network of outstanding national and international partner organizations.

The Centre will improve our understanding of the processes that trigger or enhance extremes and build this understanding into our modelling systems. The improved predictions of climate extremes will enable improvements in how Australia copes with extremes now and in the future.

Breaking news

Research brief: New technique to select best model subset for extreme projections

Climate models are extremely useful tools for investigating how our climate may change in the future. However, all climate models exhibit biases that must be accounted for,...

Research brief: Ecohydrological equilibrium approach improves modelling of LAI

How many leaves should a tree grow? This information is critical to climate models as the amount of leaf area per unit ground area, or leaf area index (LAI), helps determines the...

Research brief: Successful science outreach with social media

Over four years, the Norwegian Polar Institute’s (NPI) Ocean and Sea Ice team used the social media handle @oceanseaicenpi across Instagram, Twitter and Facebook to communicate...

Kelp’s record journey exposes Antarctic ecosystems to change

When Chilean researcher Dr Erasmo Macaya from Universidad de Concepción and Centro IDEAL stumbled upon foreign kelp washed up on an Antarctic beach, he knew he had...

Research brief: Paris target impacts compared using pattern scaling projections and climate model outputs

The Paris Agreement prompted a range of studies that compared the difference to our climate if the global warming target was limited to 1.5°C and 2°C levels above pre-industrial...

Research brief: Regional climate models capture changes to extreme storms

Short, extreme rainfall events will increase in a warming climate, according to observations and climate models. Australian observations suggest these storms become smaller in...

Multiple PhD opportunities – CLEX Monash

The CLEX node at Monash is offering several PhD scholarships on a competitive basis in the areas of: Climate Variability, Extremes and Change (Julie Arblaster. Email:...

Some trees may survive future heat better than expected

Climate change is expected to increase heatwaves, with wide ranging impacts for tree function and carbon uptake. However, we have little information regarding the impact of...

Research briefs

Research brief: Tropical thunderstorms strengthen without cold pools

The processes governing the formation, maintenance, and propagation of tropical thunderstorms are not fully understood. In the midlatitudes, established theory explains the...

Here’s what happens when you turn off convective parameterisations

If you thought climate models would perform badly with convective parameterisations turned off, then think again. Convective parameterizations are widely believed to be essential...

Research brief: Ecohydrological equilibrium approach improves modelling of LAI

How many leaves should a tree grow? This information is critical to climate models as the amount of leaf area per unit ground area, or leaf area index (LAI), helps determines the...

New insight into plant growth under climate change

The process of photosynthesis determines the amount of carbon available for plants to grow. However, experimental work has highlighted that the flux of photosynthesis and timing...

Research brief: Paris target impacts compared using pattern scaling projections and climate model outputs

The Paris Agreement prompted a range of studies that compared the difference to our climate if the global warming target was limited to 1.5°C and 2°C levels above pre-industrial...

Mapping transpiration in climate models

Transpiration – the evaporation of water from plants –  is one of the dominant forces in the Earth’s water cycle. To get a sense of how it will change in...

Measuring changes in our atmosphere from seconds to decades

This paper, A census of atmospheric variability from seconds to decades, synthesises and summarises atmospheric variability on time scales from seconds to...

How climate models work

CLEX Chief Investigator Prof Christian Jakob at a recent Monash University STEM talk takes his audience ​into the world of climate models. It's a talk that...

CLEX Research programs

Extreme rainfall

Heatwaves and cold air outbreaks

Drought

Climate variability and teleconnections