CLEX, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes

The Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes (CLEX) is a major initiative funded by the Australian Research Council. The Centre is an international research consortium of five Australian universities and a network of outstanding national and international partner organizations.

The Centre will improve our understanding of the processes that trigger or enhance extremes and build this understanding into our modelling systems. The improved predictions of climate extremes will enable improvements in how Australia copes with extremes now and in the future.

Breaking news

PhD Opportunity: Methods from statistical physics to resolve weather and climate sensitivities

A key limitation of weather and climate forecasts is that cloud and turbulent processes are very complex, and remain crudely represented in weather and climate models due to lack...

PhD Opportunity: Dissecting heatwaves: the importance of physical mechanisms and human influence.

Heatwaves negatively impact human health, infrastructure, and natural ecosystems. Observations highlight that the frequency, magnitude and duration of heatwaves are increasing...

PhD Opportunity: Locating renewable energy sites to avoid climate and financial risk

Renewable energy is dependent on the weather, and the future of the industry relies on a greater understanding on the impact climate change will have on these variable resources....

PhD opportunity: How intense will design storms become with rising temperatures

Our research shows storms will intensify as temperature rise. This PhD will assess the extent of increase using climate modelling experiments. Such experiments have traditionally...

The science manuscript submission process

Drawing on 5 years of experience as an editor for Geophysical Research Letters, Peter Strutton presented a talk that covered what happens between submission of a manuscript and...

PhD Opportunity: Ocean heat recycling during El Niño events

The El Niño Southern Oscillation is the largest driver of interannual climate variability, impacting weather extremes worldwide. Key to understanding ENSO is the role of diabatic...

PhD Opportunity: How complex should a land surface model be to accurately predict extremes?

We live in a data-rich world, yet the representations of the land surface in climate models were largely conceived in the absence of observations. Comparisons against...

PhD Opportunity: Latent heat balance dynamics and heatwaves in cities

Climate change strongly impacts the climate of cities, especially during heatwaves where there are synergies between synoptic conditions and local climate. Lack of understanding...

Research briefs

New research rewrites Southern Ocean mixing calculations

World-first modelling research– which used several million CPU hours in Australia’s fastest supercomputer, Raijin, and ran calculations non-stop for over a year – has...

Understanding water-use efficiency in plants

To grow, plants open their stomates to capture carbon dioxide, whilst simultaneously losing water through the process of transpiration. Previous work has...

Marine heatwaves increase around Tasmania

Centre of Excellence researchers have identified 12 marine heatwave types off the east coast of Tasmania, a location recognised as a global warming hotspot. Average sea surface...

Why record-breaking droughts had very different impacts on Amazon forests

In 2005, the Amazon experienced a once-in-a-century drought. Five years later, in 2010, it was struck by a worse drought, with even lower rainfall occurring in the...

Research brief: Tropical thunderstorms strengthen without cold pools

The processes governing the formation, maintenance, and propagation of tropical thunderstorms are not fully understood. In the midlatitudes, established theory explains the...

Research brief: Future climate risk from compound events

CLEX researchers, as part of an international team writing in Nature Climate Change, have called on climate impact researchers and industry to change the way they interpret and...

Mapping transpiration in climate models

Transpiration – the evaporation of water from plants –  is one of the dominant forces in the Earth’s water cycle. To get a sense of how it will change in...

How plants survive droughts

Understanding which species can recover from drought, under what conditions and the mechanistic processes involved, will help researchers predict plant mortality in response to...

CLEX Research programs

Extreme rainfall

Heatwaves and cold air outbreaks

Drought

Climate variability and teleconnections