CLEX, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes

The Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes (CLEX) is a major initiative funded by the Australian Research Council. The Centre is an international research consortium of five Australian universities and a network of outstanding national and international partner organizations.

The Centre will improve our understanding of the processes that trigger or enhance extremes and build this understanding into our modelling systems. The improved predictions of climate extremes will enable improvements in how Australia copes with extremes now and in the future.

Breaking news

Hail the new storm app for citizen science, WeatheX

If you are a stormchaser or just someone who loves the theatre of wind, lightning, heavy rain and hail when a storm whips through, then you are perfectly placed to help climate...

Research brief: Global warming to transform Australia’s temperate marine ecosystems

Deep ocean reefs are likely to transform with global warming bringing together species from temperate and tropical waters that may have never coexisted before. This was the...

Research brief: Drivers of Antarctic sea ice volume change in CMIP 5 models

The observed increase in Antarctic sea ice is thought to be mostly driven by surface winds. These winds drive the motion of sea ice and shift warm air southwards to melt ice in...

Research brief: How strong currents influence Tasmania’s marine heatwaves

The near‐surface waters off eastern Tasmania represent both a global warming and a biodiversity hotspot. Marine ecosystems there are under significant stress. The sensitivity of...

Research briefs

How predictable are land-atmosphere fluxes in different ecosystems?

A new study by CLEX researchers identifies regions of high and low predictability and will likely help improve land surface model evaluation. It focuses on observations of the...

New research rewrites Southern Ocean mixing calculations

World-first modelling research– which used several million CPU hours in Australia’s fastest supercomputer, Raijin, and ran calculations non-stop for over a year – has...

Research brief: Tropical thunderstorms strengthen without cold pools

The processes governing the formation, maintenance, and propagation of tropical thunderstorms are not fully understood. In the midlatitudes, established theory explains the...

Research brief: How strong currents influence Tasmania’s marine heatwaves

The near‐surface waters off eastern Tasmania represent both a global warming and a biodiversity hotspot. Marine ecosystems there are under significant stress. The sensitivity of...

CLEX Research programs

Extreme rainfall

Drought

Heatwaves and cold air outbreaks

Climate variability and teleconnections