CLEX, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes

The Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes (CLEX) is an international research consortium of five Australian universities and a network of outstanding national and international partner organizations supported by the Australian Research Council.

Climate extremes are the confluence of high impact weather and climate variability. The Centre will improve our understanding of the processes that trigger or enhance extremes and build this understanding into our modelling systems. The improved predictions of climate extremes will help Australia cope with extremes now and in the future.

Breaking news

Research brief: How uncertainties in data and drought indices affect drought identification

Picture (above): Dry landscape. Credit: PXhere (CC0). Drought is a slowly evolving phenomenon whose modulating mechanisms stem from complex interactions of atmospheric, land...

Are Video Games Turning Your Kids into Environmentalists?

As a Melburnian, the last two months have been rough, and the prospect of another month and a bit of stay-at-home orders is pretty depressing, to say the least. For the sake of...

Where does Australia’s rain come from?

Picture: Rainbow. Credit: Binyamin Mellish (Pexels). Where does our rain come from? For a drought-prone continent like Australia, and a country with communities and industries...

Analysis reveals where marine heatwaves will intensify fastest

Picture (above): Boat on water at sunset. Credit: Johannes Plenio. The world’s strongest ocean currents, which play key roles in fisheries and ocean ecosystems, will experience...

Research briefs

Research brief: Cold core eddies take heat across sub-Antarctic front.

Eddies are rotating bodies of water with diameters between 10-100 km that live from a week to months in the ocean. They are known to carry heat and salt across the Antarctic...

Research brief: Changes to weather features of atmospheric conversion lines drive future changes to rainfall

Future changes in precipitation have been shown to have contributions from both thermodynamic and dynamic processes. Although the thermodynamic part is reasonably well understood...

Research brief: How strong currents influence Tasmania’s marine heatwaves

The near‐surface waters off eastern Tasmania represent both a global warming and a biodiversity hotspot. Marine ecosystems there are under significant stress. The sensitivity of...

Research brief: Wind reversals have same surface impacts as sudden stratospheric warming events

Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs) are events in the upper atmosphere where the usually strong eastward winds over the winter pole suddenly slow down and even reverse...

CLEX Research programs

Extreme rainfall

Drought

Heatwaves and cold air outbreaks

Climate variability and teleconnections