CLEX, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes

The Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes (CLEX) is an international research consortium of five Australian universities and a network of outstanding national and international partner organizations supported by the Australian Research Council.

Climate extremes are the confluence of high impact weather and climate variability. The Centre will improve our understanding of the processes that trigger or enhance extremes and build this understanding into our modelling systems. The improved predictions of climate extremes will help Australia cope with extremes now and in the future.

Breaking news

Briefing note 10: Research on heatwaves and droughts by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes supports a major international report on Climate Change and Land

Download briefing note here. KEY POINTS Research by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes has been highlighted in a major international report on Climate Change and...

CLEX annual workshop, 2019

This year’s annual workshop, held in Hobart, brought together complex science, explainers, breakout meetings and poster sessions in a way that was perhaps the most accessible...

Montreal Protocol set to slow global warming by at least 1°C

Picture: Stratosphere. Credit: Willpower The Montreal Protocol, an international agreement signed in 1987 to stop chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) destroying the ozone layer, now...

Climate change will increase frequency of Australia’s most dangerous fires

Picture: Tatong Bushfire. Credit: Andrew Wallace (Flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0). Catastrophic wildfires like the Black Saturday wildfires in 2009 and Canberra Wildfires of 2003, which...

Research briefs

Research brief: Southern ozone hole observations could improve seasonal forecasts

The long-term trend in the size of the Antarctic ozone hole has impacted Southern Hemisphere surface climate by shifting the wind patterns further south, away from Australia. As...

Research brief: Southern Ocean’s clockwise eddies are most productive

Ocean eddies are spinning parcels of water about 100km across and 1500m deep. They occur everywhere in the ocean. In the Southern Hemisphere, eddies that spin clockwise are...

Research brief: Droughts inconsistently represented across climate models

Global climate models (GCMs) are essential for understanding future changes in droughts but it remains unclear how well these models simulate droughts. This study evaluated GCMs...

Research brief: Wind changes over the Southern Ocean impact its capacity to take up carbon and heat

Picture (above): Wind off Cape Terawhiti. Credit Phil Norton. (Creative Commons license - Flickr) The transport of surface waters into the ocean interior (“ventilation”) plays a...

CLEX Research programs

Extreme rainfall

Drought

Heatwaves and cold air outbreaks

Climate variability and teleconnections