CLEX, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes

The Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes (CLEX) is a major initiative funded by the Australian Research Council. The Centre is an international research consortium of five Australian universities and a network of outstanding national and international partner organizations.

The Centre will improve our understanding of the processes that trigger or enhance extremes and build this understanding into our modelling systems. The improved predictions of climate extremes will enable improvements in how Australia copes with extremes now and in the future.

Breaking news

Research brief: The importance of humidity in heat stress

Traditionally heat stress has been measured via temperature.  However, we also know that humidity makes a big difference to heat stress.  How big a difference has been a matter...

Research brief: A building energy demand and urban land surface model

Nine out of ten Australians live in urban areas, where energy use is significantly impacted by variability in local weather and a changing climate. Urban structures and the...

Research briefing note 001: What is the chance of global warming exceeding 1.5°C in the next 5 years?

by Ian Macadam The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) recently released its special report on Global Warming of 1.5°C. It stated that human-induced...

Research brief: Ice particle numbers plummet in Southern Ocean’s clouds

To understand and model Earth’s climate it is essential that we understand clouds. This means not only knowing how many clouds there are, but also what type and how they were...

Research briefs

Research brief: Climate models under-represent tropical heating variations

We know that enormous amounts of heat are released in tropical thunderstorm clouds and that this heating plays an important role in maintaining global circulation patterns. But...

Research brief: Summertime Heatwaves in Brisbane

Heat waves are the deadliest natural hazard in Australia. Motivated by the projection that the number of extremely hot days in subtropical Australia will increase in a warmer...

Research brief: Why record-breaking droughts had very different impacts on Amazon forests

In 2005, the Amazon experienced a once-in-a-century drought. Five years later, in 2010, it was struck by a worse drought, with even lower rainfall occurring in the...

Research brief: How predictable are land-atmosphere fluxes in different ecosystems?

A new study by CLEX researchers identifies regions of high and low predictability and will likely help improve land surface model evaluation. It focuses on observations of the...

CLEX Research programs

Extreme rainfall

Drought

Heatwaves and cold air outbreaks

Climate variability and teleconnections