Tag Archive: Andy Pitman

COP26 will not keep temperatures below 1.5°C and maybe not 2°C

October 25, 2021 9:13 am Published by Comments Off on COP26 will not keep temperatures below 1.5°C and maybe not 2°C

The Glasgow Climate Conference of Parties, COP26, is almost certain to fall short of its first goal to “keep 1.5°C within reach”. Moreover, even if it achieved its other aim to “secure global net-zero by mid-century” there is still a high probability that global temperatures will exceed 2°C if this isn’t matched by increased short-term action as well. That’s the message coming from climate scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes (CLEX).

IPCC AR6 Working Group 1 report: conclusions on the evolving risk of drought

September 7, 2021 3:58 pm Published by Comments Off on IPCC AR6 Working Group 1 report: conclusions on the evolving risk of drought

Drought is a major risk to Australia with extended periods of drought affecting our social, economic and environmental systems. The newly released report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change contains significant new assessments of the science and future projections of drought.

Director’s Report – August 2021

August 26, 2021 10:36 am Published by Comments Off on Director’s Report – August 2021

The past four months have seen our engagement with policymakers and industry accelerate. CLEX has been extremely active in briefing Federal and State policymakers, businesses and other stakeholders on the new IPCC report, growing our impact and influence well beyond academia.

Briefing note 16: What is left in the global carbon budget?

August 25, 2021 3:37 pm Published by Comments Off on Briefing note 16: What is left in the global carbon budget?

The Paris Agreement requires countries to commit to reducing their greenhouse gas emissions to ensure that the global average temperature remains well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C. But how likely are we to meet these targets?

Radix malorum est cupiditas*

August 14, 2021 12:34 pm Published by Comments Off on Radix malorum est cupiditas*

While Chaucer wrote “The love of money is the root of evil” there is a growing recognition that how money flows through the national and global economy, how investors choose to prioritise investments, and how statutory authorities such as the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority (APRA) regulate business around climate risk all have the potential to help solve the climate problem.

Briefing note 15: Can we limit global warming to 1.5C°?

July 28, 2021 2:43 pm Published by Comments Off on Briefing note 15: Can we limit global warming to 1.5C°?

Irrespective of tipping points, climate change adaptation efforts will be less costly and disruptive to society – and will stand a better chance of success – if warming can be limited to 1.5°C rather than 2°C or higher. We therefore in no way advocate for policies that forgo pursuing the ambition to limit global warming to 1.5°C, regardless of whether that target remains feasible or not.

Prof Andy Pitman made a fellow of AAS

May 26, 2021 10:26 am Published by Comments Off on Prof Andy Pitman made a fellow of AAS

CLEX Director, Prof Andy Pitman has been elected as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science for his outstanding contribution to climate change.

Research brief: El Niño variations have little impact on terrestrial carbon cycle

April 30, 2021 12:16 pm Published by Comments Off on Research brief: El Niño variations have little impact on terrestrial carbon cycle

Different expressions of El Niño do affect interannual variability in the terrestrial carbon cycle. However, the effect over longer timescales is small. This means the changing frequency of these two types of El Niño events may be of little importance in terms of robustly simulating the future terrestrial carbon cycle.

CLEX Director’s report – April 2021

April 16, 2021 2:05 pm Published by Comments Off on CLEX Director’s report – April 2021

We have started 2021 some reorganisation of our research programs. While our research has not changed, it is now framed in five research programs that emphasise the strengths of our Centre and should lead to deeper interaction between the programs.